Accessing Dundas with Python

Dundas has a great REST API. You can basically do everything with. Furthermore, it’s easy to find examples, as you just have to look at what your Dundas web app does, and you have all the examples and use cases you can wish for.

I wanted to schedule cube refreshes, so I naturally turned toward Python. It wasn’t too complex, as you will see below. The one thing to take care of is logging out, in all possible cases, otherwise you will burn very fast through your elastic hours (been there, done that). I’ll show you here how I did it with a context manager, which means that I can basically not forget to log out, whatever happens, it’s all managed for me.

In my code in production, this object actually does something (refreshes cubes), this is only a skeleton to get you started. You can find the code as well on my github, it might be easier to read.

The code actually does not do much: the call to __new__ associated with contextlib.closing() allows you to use the object DundasSession within a context manager, with the keyword with, thus guaranteeing you that you will always log out, no matter what, even if an exception or a sys.exit occurs.

#!/usr/bin/env python3

"""
Skeleton to use Dundas Rest API, with guaranteed log out.
"""
import contextlib
import logging
import requests
import sys

class DundasSession:
    """
    Using __new__ + contextlib.closing() is awesome.

    DundasSession can now be used within a context manager, meaning that whatever happens, its close() method
    will be called (thus logging out). No need to call logout() explicitely!
    Just using __del__ is not guaranteed to work because when __del__ is called, you do not know which objects
    are already destroyed, and the session object might well be dead.
    """
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        o=super().__new__(cls)
        o.__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        return contextlib.closing(o)

    def __init__(self, user, pwd, url):
        # For session reuse - TCP connection reuse, keeps cookies.
        self.s = requests.session()

        self.user = user
        self.pwd = pwd
        self.url = url
        self.api = self.url + '/api/'
        self.session_id = None  # Will bet set in login()

    def login(self):
        """Login and returns the session_id"""
        login_data = {
            'accountName': self.user,
            'password': self.pwd,
            'deleteOtherSessions': False,
            'isWindowsLogOn': False
        }
        logging.info('Logging in.')
        r = self.s.post(self.api + 'logon/', json=login_data)
        # The following line exceptions out on not 200 return code.
        r.raise_for_status()

        resp = r.json()
        if resp['logOnFailureReason'].lower() == "none":
            # We're in!
            logging.info('Logged in')
            self.session_id = resp['sessionId']
        else:
            logging.error('Login failed with message: ' + r.text)
            sys.exit(1)

    def close(self):
        """Automagically called by the context manager."""
        self.logout()

    def logout(self):
        """If you do not logout, session will stay active, potentially burning through your elastic hours very fast."""

        # If session_id is not defined, we did not even log in (or we are already logged out).
        logging.info('Logging out.')
        if getattr(self, 'session_id', None):
            r = self.s.delete(self.api + 'session/current', params={'sessionId': self.session_id})
            r.raise_for_status()
            del self.session_id
            logging.info('Logged out.')
        else:
            logging.info('Was not yet Logged in.')

logging.basicConfig(level='INFO')

with DundasSession(user='yourapiuser', pwd='pwd', url='https://reports.example.com') as dundas:
    dundas.login()

    # Do something smart with your Dundas object.

# No need to log out, this is handled for you via the context manager, even in case of exception or even sys.exit.

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